UU celebrations, holidays

Traditions ground us and connect us to our families, communities and the world around us. From birth to death, our celebrations help us live with deeper gratitude, greater connection, and more reverence for life.

Holidays, gatherings

Christmas, Easter, and more. We place great value on the stories that have shaped our culture and our religion, while approaching traditional holidays in non-traditional ways. Focus is on the meaning and morals of the stories or traditions, and what those messages mean for us on our personal paths of spiritual growth and in our relationships with and service to others.

In addition to Christmas and Easter, we have an annual Winter Solstice service, a Mid-summer celebration, our Jewish Heritage group holds traditional Jewish celebrations, and those home for the holidays often gather at Thanksgiving. Interspersed throughout the year are the Flower Communion in the spring to celebrate beauty and diversity, the Water Communion as we gather and reflect on return from summer travels, and the Fire Communion in January to mark the end of one year and the start of another.

Weddings and memorial services

Our custom-made weddings and memorial services honor the people involved by reflecting their unique personalities and values. Rev. Tom Capo works closely with couples and loved ones to personalize these very special events.

Youth milestones

Child dedication ceremonies are crafted by the parents and Rev. Tom. The ceremony might include a blessing for the new life of the child, an expression of the parent or parents’ hopes for the child and a promise by the congregation to support and nurture the child. If you are interested in an infant or older child dedication, please contact Rev. Tom.

Teen ceremonies – Coming of Age for 7th/8th graders (in even years’ Spring); Transition, Affirmation and Graduation (TAG) for high school juniors/seniors (in odd years’ Spring).

These programs mark a child’s growth and personal journey in their transition through adolescence and into young adulthood. Both programs partner a teen with an adult mentor (a respected adult, chosen by the parents and Director of Religious Education) for activities throughout a church year as they learn more about the church, articulate their personal beliefs to share with the congregation and reflect on how they integrate those values into their lives. Visit the Religious Education brochure to learn more about how these fit into the overall youth education program.